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Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

The City of Mission Viejo is committed to protecting the environment and recognizes the importance of recycling and proper waste disposal practices. To preserve and protect the beauty and health of the community, Mission Viejo offers a variety of recycling programs and provides information to assist residents and businesses in their efforts to green the community.  Contact City staff to learn more about the programs and services offered in Mission Viejo or to obtain information.

Bottle and Can Recycling

In 1987, the State of California passed the California Beverage Container and Litter Reduction Act to provide an incentive to help increase beverage container recycling rates.  The Act requires consumers purchasing beverages in certain recyclable bottles and cans in California to pay a deposit referred to as California Redemption Value (CRV) at the point of purchase.  The deposit is 5 cents on containers less than 24 ounces and 10 cents on containers 24 ounces or larger. 

Thanks to this cash incentive, 230 billion aluminum, glass, and plastic beverage containers have been recycled since the program first started, but work is still needed.  Last year, Californians bought 21 billion beverages in aluminum, glass, plastic, and bi-metal containers.  Over 17.2 billion of those containers were recycled saving natural resources, conserving energy, and extending the life our landfills; however, nearly 6 billion beverage containers were tossed in the trash and disposed in California landfills.

CRV Centers

TOMRA PACIFIC/RE-PLANET
27730 Santa Margarita Parkway
1 (877) 737-5263

Located behind Ralphs
(Santa Margarita & Marguerite)
Open 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  
Tuesday and Thursday through Saturday
Closed for lunch from 1:00 pm. to 1:30 p.m.
Closed Monday and Wednesday
 
NEXCYCLE
26022 Marguerite Parkway
1 (800) 883-2274

Located next to Pavilions
(Marguerite & Oso)
Open 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday through Sunday
Closed for lunch from 1:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Closed Monday and Tuesday
 
TOMRA PACIFIC/RE-PLANET
25104 Marguerite Parkway
1 (877) 737-5263
Located behind Ralphs
(La Paz & Marguerite)
Open 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday
Closed for lunch from 1:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
 
CROWN VALLEY MARKET
27771 Center Drive
1 (714) 931-5004

Open 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday
Closed for lunch from 1:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Closed Sunday and Monday
TOMRA PACIFIC/RE-PLANET
23072 Alicia Parkway
1 (877) 737-5263
Located behind Albertsons
(Alicia & Olympiad)
Open 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday
Closed for lunch from 1:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
 

Public Facilities and Park Recycling

In an effort to capture more bottles and cans, Mission Viejo provides recycling containers in its high-use parks and at certain public facilities throughout the city, making it more convenient for people to recycle away from home.

Mission Viejo hopes that these efforts will help us get one step closer to recycling all of our beverage containers.  Do your part and look for recycling containers when you visit the following locations in Mission Viejo:

  • Curtis Park
  • Beebe Park
  • Gilleran Park
  • Alicia Park
  • Oso Viejo Park
  • Florence Joyner Olympiad Park
  • World Cup Soccer/Potocki Center
  • Montanoso Recreation Center
  • Civic Center (City Hall & Mission Viejo Library)
  • Norman P. Murray Community & Senior Center

If you don’t have time to visit a recycling center, simply toss your empty bottles and cans in your residential recycling cart or bin.

Commercial Recycling Programs

The City of Mission Viejo and its solid waste provider, Waste Management of Orange County, are dedicated to recycling and have developed a comprehensive commercial recycling program. This program is designed to assist businesses and multi-family facilities implement or expand recycling and is provided to businesses and multi-family developments at a reduced cost.  In fact, implementing a recycling program may reduce your trash bill.

Assembly Bill 341 Mandatory Commercial Recycling

California Assembly Bill 341 requires all commercial businesses and multi-family properties to recycle.  The legislation became effective July 1, 2012, and was designed to help meet California's recycle goal of 75% by the year 2020.

Assembly Bill 1826 Mandatory Organics Recycling

Assembly Bill 1826 requires all businesses that generate a certain amount of organic waste (food waste) to develop a program to recycle that waste.  Organic waste includes food scraps, vegetable trimmings, plate scrapings, and spoiled food.  The City’s waste hauler Waste Management has developed a Food Recycling Program to help businesses meet the requirements of Assembly Bill 1826.

To comply with the law, businesses can select from any combination of these food-recycling options:

In partnership with its waste hauler, the City provides complimentary technical assistance to help businesses comply with these laws.  For more information or to request assistance, please contact the Public Works Department at 949-470-3010.

Multi-Family Recycling Program

The City’s trash hauler, Waste Management, provides recycling to multi-family facilities as part of its agreement with the City.  Each year, Waste Management contracts with a consulting firm to provide waste audits at multi-family developments and to assist them with implementing or expanding recycling programs.  During the waste audit, the consultant examines the contents of the trash to determine the amount of recyclables in the trash and to determine if a recycling program is feasible. 

If a recycling program is feasible, the consultant prepares a proposal that is submitted to the property managers informing them how much recycling was found in their trash.  The proposal explains that the facilities can save money on their trash bills by reducing the contents of their trash by adding recycling containers. 

Below is a partial list of materials that can be collected as part of a multi-family recycling program.

  • Anything that tears
  • Cardboard (flattened)
  • Cereal boxes (liners removed), other food boxes
  • Computer paper, white paper, mixed paper
  • Empty aerosol cans
  • Glass jars and bottles*
  • Metal food and soup cans*
  • Newspapers, junk mail, magazines
  • Pie tins*
  • Plastic containers (labeled #1-7)
  • Plastic shopping bags (place bags inside each other to create one large bundle)
  • Plastic water and soda bottles*
  • Soda cans*
  • Telephone books
  • Tissue and soda boxes
  • Wine and liquor bottles*

*Please lightly rinse food residue from containers.

Do not place the items listed below in recycling bins—put these items in the trash bin:

  • Carpeting
  • Ceramic items
  • Clothing (donate this item!)
  • Disposable diapers
  • Drinking glasses
  • Empty motor oil cans or containers
  • Empty paint cans
  • Greasy pizza boxes
  • Mirrors, window glass, auto glass
  • Pet waste
  • Rubber latex items
  • Soiled aluminum foil
  • Soiled paper towels or plates

Business Recycling Program

The City’s trash hauler, Waste Management, provides free business recycling as part of its agreement with the City.  Each year, Waste Management contracts with a consulting firm to conduct waste audits at several businesses.  During the waste audit, the consultant examines the contents of the trash to determine the amount of recyclables in the trash and to determine if a recycling program is feasible. 

If a recycling program is feasible, the consultant prepares a proposal that is submitted to the business informing it how much recycling was found in its trash.  The proposal explains that the business can save money on its trash bill by reducing the contents of its trash by adding recycling container(s). 

Below is a partial list of materials that can be collected as part of a business recycling program.

  • Anything that tears
  • Cardboard (flattened)
  • Cereal boxes (liners removed), other food boxes
  • Computer paper, white paper, mixed paper
  • Empty aerosol cans
  • Glass jars and bottles*
  • Metal food and soup cans*
  • Newspapers, junk mail, magazines
  • Pie tins*
  • Plastic containers (labeled #1-7)
  • Plastic shopping bags (place bags inside each other to create one large bundle)
  • Plastic water and soda bottles*
  • Soda cans*
  • Telephone books
  • Tissue and soda boxes
  • Wine and liquor bottles*

*Please lightly rinse food residue from containers.

Construction & Demolition Waste Recycling

The City of Mission Viejo implemented a Construction and Demolition (C&D) Waste Recycling Program (Ordinance No. 04-225) to divert C&D material from California landfills and to assist the City in achieving diversion requirements mandated by Assembly Bill 939.  This program requires that 75% of C&D waste generated at “covered projects” in the City be diverted from landfill disposal through reuse and recycling.  C&D material typically consists of waste generated during construction, renovation, or demolition of buildings, pavements, or other structures.

The information below provides detailed information about the City of Mission Viejo’s C&D Program including the forms and reports necessary to comply with the ordinance.

Fluorescent Light Bulb Recycling

Fluorescent lights, including tubes and compact fluorescent lights (CFL), are considered hazardous waste and cannot be thrown in the trash. Fluorescent bulbs and tubes are filled with mercury vapor that emits ultraviolet light when electricity is applied. The bulbs/tubes have a coating inside that turns the ultraviolet rays into visible light. CFL are the most energy efficient of all light; they use 67 percent less energy than standard incandescent bulbs and last longer.

The Home Depot store located in Mission Viejo accepts fluorescent and compact fluorescent lights for disposal.  Lights can be dropped off at the Customer Service Desk.  The Home Depot is located at 27952 Hillcrest, just north of Saddleback College.

Additionally, the County of Orange operates four household hazardous waste collection centers. These centers are free to all Orange County residents. The centers are open Tuesday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (closed on holidays) and are located at:

  • Anaheim, 10171 North Blue Gum Street
  • Huntington Beach, 17121 Nichols Street
  • Irvine, 6411 Oak Canyon
  • San Juan Capistrano, 32250 La Pata Avenue

Home Composting

Composting is often defined as nature’s way of recycling organic waste, because the biological process breaks down organic material into nutrient rich fertilizer or soil amendment, which is returned back to the Earth to feed our plants and gardens.  Organic waste includes items such as food scraps, leaves, twigs, grass trimmings, paper, and coffee grounds.

The compost itself is beneficial for the land in many ways, including as a soil conditioner, a fertilizer, and as a natural pesticide for soil.  Composting also helps the environment by reducing the amount of waste sent to landfills.  Waste that is landfilled not only takes up valuable space, but it also releases methane gas, which is responsible for climate change.

Only a few easy-to-find ingredients are necessary for backyard composting, so why not give it a try?  You will be helping the environment and your garden.  To learn more, watch MVTV Healthy Mission:  Backyard Composting.

The following Recipe for Backyard Composting is from CalRecycle’s Backyard Composting webpage.

Ingredients
While a multitude of organisms, fungus and bacteria are involved in the overall process, there are four basic ingredients for composting: nitrogen, carbon, water, and air. The easiest compost recipe calls for blending roughly equal parts of green or wet material (which is high in nitrogen) and brown or dry material (which is high in carbon). Simply layer or mix these materials in a pile or enclosure; chop or shred large pieces to 12" or shorter. Water and fluff the compost to add air. Then leave it to the microorganisms, which will break down the material over time.

Nitrogen
Green materials such as grass clippings and landscape trimmings are ideal sources of nitrogen for composting.  Vegetable and fruit trimmings and peels can also provide nitrogen for composting.  Coffee grounds and tea bags may look brown, but are actually potent nitrogen sources.  To reduce the potential for pests or odors, avoid meat or dairy scraps and always bury food scraps deep within the compost pile. Avoid pet feces due to concerns about pathogens.  However, manure from chickens, turkeys, cows or horses is rich in nitrogen and can help your compost pile get to proper temperatures and make very good compost.

Carbon
Brown (dry) yard and garden material such as dry leaves, twigs, hay, or shredded paper can provide the carbon balance for a compost pile.  Chop or shred large pieces to 12 inches or shorter (thick, woody branches should be chipped, ground up, or left out).  Untreated wood chips and sawdust are a powerful carbon source, which may be useful if the pile contains excess nitrogen.

Water
One of the most common mistakes in composting is letting the pile get too dry. Your compost pile should be as moist as a wrung-out sponge.  A moisture content of 40 to 60 percent is preferable. To test for adequate moisture, reach into your compost pile and grab a handful of material and squeeze it.  If a few drops of water come out, it's probably got enough moisture, if it doesn't, add water.  When you water, it is best to put a hose into the pile so that you aren't just wetting the top. You can also water as you are turning the pile. During dry weather, you may have to add water regularly.  During wet weather, you may need to cover your pile.  A properly constructed compost pile will drain excess water and not become soggy.

Air
The bacteria and fungus that are in your compost pile need oxygen to live.  If your pile is too dense or becomes too wet, the air supply to the inside is cut off and the beneficial organisms will die.  Decomposition will slow and an offensive odor may arise.  To avoid this, turn and fluff the pile with a pitchfork often, perhaps weekly.  You can also turn the pile by just re-piling it into a new pile.  Wash hands after handling compost or use gloves.

Size
Ideally, the compost pile should be at least three feet wide by three feet deep by three feet tall (one cubic yard).  This size provides enough food and insulation for the organisms to live.  However, piles can be larger or smaller and work just fine if managed well.

Household Hazardous Waste/Special Waste

Many common household products used in our daily activities contain potentially hazardous ingredients and require special disposal.  These products, which are often referred to as Household Hazardous Waste, contain corrosive, toxic, ignitable, or reactive ingredients and cannot be thrown in the trash, on the ground, or down storm drains.  This is because chemicals that are not properly disposed of can threaten the environment by contaminating our air and water.

Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) includes products such as paints, antifreeze, pool chemicals, cleaners, used motor oil and oil filters, batteries, pesticides, sharps/needles, and e-waste/u-waste.

There are a variety of convenient ways for Mission Viejo residents to safely and legally dispose of their household hazardous waste.  You can learn more about your disposal options below.

Household Hazardous Waste:  Curbside and Drop-Off Programs

Household products that contain corrosive, toxic, ignitable, or reactive ingredients are considered to be household hazardous waste.  These items pose a risk to the environment and cannot be thrown in the household trash.  Household hazardous waste includes items such as paints, antifreeze, pool chemicals, cleaners, used motor oil and filters, batteries, pesticides, sharps/needles, and e-waste.

How do I Properly Dispose of Household Hazardous Waste? 
Mission Viejo residents have two ways to safely and properly dispose of household hazardous waste:

Door-to-Door Collection Program
Through its trash hauler, Mission Viejo offers a door-to-door program for the collection of household hazardous waste.  This service is offered one time per year per residence.  To schedule an appointment to have your household hazardous waste collected, please contact WM Curbside at 1-800-HHW-PKUP (1-800-449-7587).

Orange County Household Hazardous Waste Collection Centers
For residents that would prefer to take their household hazardous waste to a collection center, there are four centers located in the County of Orange.  These centers are operated by the County and are free to county residents.  The centers are open Tuesday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  They are closed on major holidays and rainy days.  Locations are listed below.

  • Anaheim, 10171 North Blue Gum Street
  • Huntington Beach, 17121 Nichols Street
  • Irvine, 6411 Oak Canyon
  • San Juan Capistrano, 32250 La Pata Avenue

For more information about items accepted at County household hazardous waste collection centers, please call 714-834-6752 or visit www.oclandfills.com.

Battery Drop-Off Program 

Common household batteries contain toxic heavy metals and/or corrosive materials that are harmful to the environment.   Recent changes in state environmental laws prohibit household batteries from being disposed of in landfills, which means batteries CANNOT be thrown in the trash or recycling bin.

Battery Management Tips

  • Batteries are hazardous waste.  DO NOT throw batteries into the trash or recycle bin.
  • Collect batteries in non-metallic, non-combustible, covered containers.  Plastic works well for battery collection.
  • Properly dispose and recycle at a collection center.
  • Use rechargeable batteries when possible.

Mission Viejo residents can recycle used batteries at the following city facilities.  Please call facility for hours of operation.

Mission Viejo City Hall
200 Civic Center
Public Works Counter/First Floor
8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Monday–Friday
949-470-3000

Mission Viejo Library
100 Civic Center (in the Lobby)
949-830-7100

Norman P. Murray Community & Senior Center
24932 Veterans Way (in the Lobby)
949-470-3062

Montanoso Recreation & Fitness Center
25800 Montanoso Drive (in the Lobby)
949-859-4348

Sierra Recreation & Fitness Center
26887 Recodo Lane (in the Lobby)
949-859-4348

Marguerite Tennis Center
23840 Marguerite Parkway
949-859-4348

Electronic Waste (E-Waste): Curbside and Drop-Off Programs

E-Waste is a common term used to describe electronic equipment that has reached or is nearing the end of its useful life or is no longer needed.  E-Waste may contain toxic chemicals such as lead or mercury and may not be disposed of in the trash.  E-Waste includes, but is not limited to, the following items:

  • Alarm Clocks
  • Camcorders
  • CD Players
  • Cell Phones
  • Computers (CPUs, laptops)
  • Computer Monitors (CRTs)
  • Copiers (home use)
  • Digital Cameras
  • Digital Thermometers
  • DVD PlayersiPods, MP3 Players
  • Microwave ovens
  • Pagers
  • PDAs
  • Printers, Scanners, Fax Machines (home use)
  • Radios, all types (home and car)
  • Telephones, Answering Machines
  • Televisions (CRTs, flat screens)
  • Video Game Consoles and Accessories
  • Walkie-Talkies, Two-Way Radios

How do I Properly Dispose of E-Waste?

Curbside Collection Program
Mission Viejo residents may have their E-Waste collected by the City’s trash hauler, Waste Management, as part of the bulky item collection program.  Please contact Waste Management at 949-642-1191 or the Mission Viejo Public Works Department at 949-470-3010 to learn more.

Collection Centers
For residents that would prefer to take their E-Waste to a collection center, there are four household hazardous waste collection centers located in the County of Orange that accept E-Waste.  These centers are operated by the County and are free to county residents.  The centers are open Tuesday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and are closed on major holidays and rainy days.

Goodwill Industries
There are two Goodwill locations in Mission Viejo that accept electronic waste, working or not.  For more information or to find a location near you go to www.ocgoodwill.org.

Used Motor Oil & Filter Collection Centers

Recycle Used Motor Oil & Filters
Used oil can contain such contaminants as lead, magnesium, copper, zinc, chromium, arsenic, chlorides, cadmium, and chlorinated compounds. Oil poured down storm drains or onto the ground can work its way into our ground and surface waters and cause serious pollution! Just one gallon of used oil can pollute one million gallons of drinking water. Mission Viejo has 12 State-Certified Used Oil Collection Centers available for the safe disposal and recycling of used motor oil.  Recycling is easy! When you do an oil change, just drain your vehicle’s oil into a clean container, seal the lid, and take it to one of the 12 conveniently located collection centers in Mission Viejo, and don’t forget the oil filter.  Oil filters contain contaminants as well and cannot be thrown in the trash. So don’t throw good oil down the drain—Recycle it!

State-Certified Used Oil Collection Centers

AAA Complete Auto Care & Tire
27913 Center Street
Mission Viejo  92692
949-347-8200

Accurate Auto Repair
25675 Taladro Circle
Mission Viejo  92691
949-472-4225

AutoZone*
22942 Los Alisos Boulevard
Mission Viejo  92691
949-830-8181

Econo Lube N' Tube
25902 El Paseo
Mission Viejo  92691
949-582-5483

EZ Lube
25800 Jeronimo Road
Mission Viejo  92691
949-859-9271

Jiffy Lube
27240 La Paz Road
Mission Viejo  92692
949-455-0470

*Center does not accept filters.

Kragen Auto Parts
24510 Alicia Parkway
Mission Viejo  92691
949-951-9175

Mission Viejo Chevron
27742 Crown Valley Parkway
Mission Viejo  92691
949-364-0137

Norm Reeves Acura of Mission Viejo
28802 Marguerite Parkway
Mission Viejo , CA 92692
949-347-0500

Ramona Tire and Auto Center
27210 La Paz Road
Mission Viejo  92692
949-583-1233

Ramona Tire and Auto Center
27865 Santa Margarita Parkway
Mission Viejo  92691
949-540-0910

South County Lexus of Mission Viejo
28242 Marguerite Pkwy
Mission Viejo  92692
949-347-3449

Sharps/Needle Disposal Program 

Beginning on September 1, 2008, State law (Section 118286 of the California Health and Safety Code) makes it illegal to dispose of sharps waste (such as hypodermic needles, lancets, and test strips) in the trash or recycling containers and requires that all sharps waste be transported to a collection center in an approved sharps container.

In Mission Viejo alone, residents with diabetes and other medical conditions use thousands of needles every day as part of treatment for chronic medical conditions. 

Disposal Containers Available at Norman P. Murray Community and Senior Center
Mission Viejo recognizes the fact that many residents may need to self-inject medication or check blood sugar levels while away from home.  If sharps are placed in the trash, this could pose a serious health risk for employees or visitors at the community and senior center.  For this reason, sharps disposal containers have been installed in the restrooms at the Norman P. Murray Community and Senior Center.  Residents attending functions at the center will now have a safe method of disposing of their sharps.

Medication Disposal Program 

At one time, flushing old medication down the toilet or washing it down the drain was an acceptable and even recommended method of disposal.  We now know that disposing of medications in this manner is harmful to the environment.  Water from inside your home goes to a wastewater treatment plant; but these plants are not designed to remove man-made pollutants, such as medications, from the water.  As a result, when the treated water is released from the wastewater treatment plants, the chemicals from the medications are still present in the water.  This presents a threat to our water bodies such as creeks, rivers, streams, and the ocean.

No Drugs Down the Drain!
The City of Mission Viejo has a medication disposal program to help keep harmful pollutants out of our waterways.  Residents can safely dispose of expired or unwanted non-controlled prescription and over-the-counter medications at the Norman P. Murray Community and Senior Center by dropping them in a secure medication disposal container.  The Norman P. Murray Community and Senior Center is located at 24932 Veterans Way.  Please call the Norman P. Murray Community & Senior Center at 949-470-3062 before dropping off your medications for center hours and to ensure that the container has space available.

Old medications and other types Household Hazardous Waste can also be delivered to one of the four County of Orange Household Hazardous Waste collection sites.  For information about the County’s program call 714-834-6752 or visit www.oclandfills.com

To learn more about the City of Mission Viejo’s Environmental Programs, contact the Public Works Department at 949-470-3010 or greenmv@cityofmissionviejo.org.

Disposal for Old Drugs–Flushing Is Not the Answer
The City of Mission Viejo provides for proper disposal of medications and sharps at the Norman P. Murray Community & Senior Center.  Additionally, the Santa Margarita Water District (SMWD) has announced that unused or expired medications can now be safely disposed of in a secure drop box located at its main office.  SMWD has implemented a “Safe Drop” medicine disposal program to help keep pharmaceutical chemicals out of our waterways and ocean.  Rather than flushing unused medications down the toilet or drain, SMWD is asking customers to safely dispose of unused non-controlled prescription and over-the-counter medications at a secure drop box at its main office located at 26111 Antonio Parkway in Rancho Santa Margarita.  The public can access the medicine drop box during SMWD’s regular business hours of Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. There is no charge to use the drop box.

Items accepted include:

  • Prescription and over-the-counter pills and capsules
  • Liquid medications, including ointments, lotions and creams (in sealed containers)
  • Veterinary medications
  • Vitamins, supplements, homeopathic remedies
  • Medical patches
  • Inhalers (empty)
  • Medical samples

“At one time, flushing old medications down the toilet or putting them in the trash was an acceptable method of disposal," said Dan Ferons, SMWD General Manager. “We now know that medications in our wastewater and landfills can have a negative effect on the environment. SMWD is pleased to provide our customers a safer way to dispose of unused medications. A secure medicine drop off and disposal not only protects the environment, it also protects our families from potential abuse or accidents.”

The drop-off medication program is provided by SMWD and is in coordination with Waste Management, Inc.  Collection of all pharmaceuticals is in accordance with United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) standards.  For more information about the “Safe Drop” program and collection, please visit www.smwd.com/safedrop or call its Customer Relations Department at 949-459-6420.

E-Waste:  Curbside and Drop-Off Programs

E-waste is a common term used to describe electronic equipment that has reached or is nearing the end of its useful life or equipment that is no longer needed.  E-waste may contain toxic chemicals such as lead or mercury and may not be disposed of in the trash.  E-waste includes, but is not limited to, the following items:

  • Alarm Clocks
  • Camcorders
  • CD Players
  • Cell Phones
  • Computers/CPUs/Laptops
  • Computer Monitors (CRTs)
  • Copiers (home use)
  • Digital Cameras
  • Digital Thermometers
  • DVD Players
  • iPods/MP3 Players
  • Microwave ovens
  • Pagers
  • PDAs
  • Printers/Scanner/Fax Machines (home use)
  • Radios—all types (home & car)
  • Telephones & Answering Machines
  • Televisions (CRTs & flat screens)/VCRs
  • Video Game Consoles & Accessories
  • Walkie-Talkies/Two-Way Radios

How do I Properly Dispose of E-Waste?

Curbside Collection Program:
Mission Viejo residents may have their E-waste collected by the City’s trash hauler, Waste Management, as part of the bulky item collection program.  Please contact Waste Management at 949-642-1191 or the Mission Viejo Public Works Department at 949-470-3010 to learn more.

Collection Centers:
For residents that would prefer to take their E-waste to a collection center, there are four household hazardous waste collection centers located in the County of Orange that accept E-waste.  These centers are operated by the County and are free to county residents.  The centers are open Tuesday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  The centers are closed on major holidays and rainy days.

  • Anaheim, 10171 North Blue Gum Street
  • Huntington Beach, 17121 Nichols Street
  • Irvine, 6411 Oak Canyon
  • San Juan Capistrano, 32250 La Pata Avenue

Goodwill Industries:
There are two Goodwill locations in Mission Viejo that accept electronic waste, working or not.  For more information or to find a location near you visit www.ocgoodwill.org.

Mission Viejo's Recycling Newsletter

Mission Viejo's Recycling Newsletter is a publication provided in partnership with Waste Management to highlight the City's environmental programs and to provide tips for living a more sustainable lifestyle.  The newsletter includes environmental topics such as recycling, waste reduction, and pollution prevention.  Look for the newsletter in your next trash bill.